No4. CLIFFORD STREET

Our New Home is Now Open

No.4 Clifford Street, the new home of Connolly, is an elegant Georgian building - one of the oldest in London’s Mayfair. The house dating from 1719 and originally conceived by the architect John Witt has been meticulously restored. This beautiful building and its architectural history has been reimagined by Gilles and Boissier, the Paris based architects and designers into a contemporary retail space and showroom set over three floors, for the Connolly collection of clothes and leather goods. Encased in elegant wood paneling, and bespoke furniture and fixtures hand crafted in fumed oak and hornbeam cabinets. 

Customers feel completely at home in this warm and welcoming environment that evokes the past and sets the scene for the present story of Connolly. 

Store Contact Details

4 Clifford Street
London, W1S 2LG

[email protected]
+44 (0)20 7952 6708

Opening Hours

Monday: 11am – 6pm
Tuesday: 10am – 6pm
Wednesday: 10am – 6pm
Thursday: 10am – 7pm
Friday: 10am – 6pm
Saturday: 11am – 5pm
Sunday: Closed

 

CURRENT EXHIBITION

NORMAN PARKINSON

Photographic Exhibition at Connolly

The epithet ‘National Treasure’ has sadly become a little over-used, however ‘Parks’ – as he was fondly known – more than deserves this title. Norman Parkinson’s eccentric and charming demeanour, oozing from his lanky 6’5” frame complete with stylish ’tache and ever-present fez, belied an astonishingly accomplished technician and inventive genius.

Working throughout a key period of photography’s development, from the 1930s to 1990, he brought an extraordinarily innovative eye, softer and more humorous than Bailey, considerably more modern than Beaton. Although a brilliant portraitist, he was probably best known for his fashion imagery. He worked with all the leading magazines, developing deep relationships with the likes of Diana Vreeland and then Grace Coddington at Vogue.

His early black-and-white work (such as the iconic 1959 shot of a couple running across a New York bridge) turned conventional fashion photography on its head, by turns injecting exuberance, informality, quirkiness and humour. Progressing to colour, he continued to produce extraordinary images throughout the 1970s and 80s, including some memorable ones with Jerry Hall.

Parks also loved a good prop. Here are some of our early favourites, of his gorgeous model-turned-wife, Wenda. True British style complete with cars and cows… what’s not to love?

Come and see some great work by one of Britain’s finest photographers here at Connolly until September.

Copyright Norman Parkinson Ltd/Courtesy Norman Parkinson Archive